From Pitching UX

If you only know 2 things about how to sell UX….

What are the most important things to know about sales and how to sell UX to your manager?  This is a very tricky question as believe it or not, sales is an extremely complex profession, which takes many years to truly master.  However, if you are a UX professional you probably don’t have years to find your feet in sales and want to know easy to master techniques to help pitch your UX skills to your manager.   So, I have attempted to break it down  into what I believe are the 2 most important things to remember when trying to pitch UX to your manager.

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Pitching UX for the first time

Summary

 

Confidently pitching the importance of UX to your manager for the first time can definitely be tricky.  Just like approaching strangers in a bar, it can be nerve wracking, exciting, fearful, you may have read lots of books on one liners and can mostly come across like you know what you are doing, but its always an unknown experience.  However, when pitching you can practice your pitch, refine it using colleagues and friends, without the fear of rejection to really make sure you create an impact when you pitch for the first time.

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Getting sign off on a UX project in less than 60 seconds

Summary

Too often CEO’s or senior managers are too busy, or don’t see value in attending hours long usability sessions.  There are many tips and tricks to get them there, providing food, drinks, bribery, but often times it just isn’t feasible.  The truth is you don’t necessarily need them to be at these sessions to make them truly appreciate the value of your work.  Instead you can still create a high impact impression by extracting the most valuable, high impact clips from your usability sessions and instantly proving the major problems of your website.

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How UX can get the budget they want

Summary

If you want to get bigger budgets for your UX work, you have to look at the problem from the eyes of your manager and even their manager.  Just as you look at interfaces from the point of view of your users, what angle is your boss looking at the problem from?  And what is your hook that will make them sit up and listen to you?  An exit rate of 10% due to poorly formatted error messages and form fields? Or $2 million dollars in lost revenue?  Which is more compelling to your manager?  You have to frame your arguments in terms that will appeal to your boss, or face always feeling like they are never listening and you are not getting the budgets you deserve.

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